Feb 05 2006

Camera Position 01 : An Introduction through an Italian window

Published by at 6:39 am under Podcast Entry

This introductory podcast explains what I want to try to accomplish with this Camera Position and what I will be talking about as the shows progress. Camera Position is a podcast about the art of creative photography, featuring the work of noted fine art photographer Jeff Curto. This episode features a photograph made in the town of Positano, Italy.

Positano, Campania, 1996
Photograph by Jeff Curto

2 responses so far

2 Responses to “Camera Position 01 : An Introduction through an Italian window”

  1. latogaon 25 Apr 2008 at 12:30 am

    Jeff, I appreciate the hidden details in this image even more so after having you point them out. Thought they would have been more appreciated if a larger display image was used. It’s hard to take in an image online when you have such a small image to view.

    There is one thing that bugs me with this image though. The fact that that the window appears to be leaning to the left based on the angle of the camera plane to the window is very distracting. I realize a lot of that had to do with the other effects you were looking to accomplish, but every time I look at this image my sense of equilibrium is seems off…it becomes such an over riding focal point for me that I loose appreciation for anything else.

  2. Jeff Curtoon 25 Apr 2008 at 12:03 pm

    Thanks, Latoga;

    I don’t make the images really big for reasons of internet piracy… just good business, really…

    As far as the distortion, it was unavoidable, as my back was up against the wall, with just enough room to put my head in between the wall and the camera. A 120mm lens was used (about the equivalent to 35mm on a 35mm camera). In order to get the camera positioned to put the diagonal of the hillside in the right place, I had to be in “just that spot.” At that point, then, my camera’s back movement (“swing” and “tilt,” which control distortion) was pretty much “pegged.”

    Frankly, I kinda like the sense of being that close to the window and the way that gives a sense of the view out.